Are you Having Good Food Conversations?

By Cameron Saylor, Recent Arizona State University Nutrition Student

Think about the last meal you ate with your friends or family. What did you talk about? Chances are you talked about your day or the weather, the latest Netflix special or just maybe, you talked about the food on your plate.

 

If you talked about the last one, give yourself a pat on the back. Talking about your food plays a key role in how you think about food and the food choices that you make for yourself and your family.

Talking about your food can come in many different forms such as discussing recipes, learning about new foods, asking questions about likes and dislikes, and even preparation methods. Depending on your situation, conversations will vary, the point is to be having these conversations.

 

When we talk about our food, we are making a deeper impact than we know.  By discussing simple items such as likes and dislikes with our friends and family, we begin to increase our awareness in the role food plays in our lives. If you are struggling to have these conversations, try bringing up your favorite meal and asking your friends and family’s opinion on the ingredients or the preparation method.

 

In the home, we can sometimes be unaware that a member of our family, especially our children, may like a certain food. By asking children questions about what they do and don’t like to eat, we can better educate them about making smart food choices. In the home, this can be as easy as asking your child what their favorite food is, and most importantly why this is their favorite food. When you are at the grocery store, explain to children what you are buying and have them help you to pick out foods. For bonus stars, get your children in the kitchen with you. Let them help you cook. Today, 30% of college students can’t boil an egg, don’t let your kid become a part of this statistic and

 

When you are at the grocery store, explain to children what you are buying and have them help you to pick out foods. For bonus stars, get your children in the kitchen with you. Let them help you cook. Today, 30% of college students can’t boil an egg, don’t let your kid become a part of this statistic.

 

There is never a wrong time to discuss this one thing you can’t live without: food.

 

For more ways to incorporate good food conversations, and other food ideas check Fill Your Plate!

 

 

 

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